A new assault on academic freedom?

A new assault on academic freedom?

In today’s Information Age, concerns have been raised about the ability of technology companies to influence public opinion and freedom of thought. Donald Trump bombards us with questionable information on Twitter. It is easy to envisage a scenario in which government-backed political consultancy firms, which have recently demonstrated a remarkable ability to influence freedom of thought in Western democratic exercises through Big Data, could control academic discourse.

Technophobia

Technophobia

Technophobia is alive and well. It may involve an “irrational or exaggerated fear of technology or complex devices such as tablets, smartphones and especially computers” (Good Therapy, 2015). Some would take issue with this definition, asserting that these fears are well justified and that machines and automation can and do replace jobs — a process John Maynard Keynes described as “technological unemployment.”